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San Mateo Discrimination Attorney

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San Mateo Discrimination Attorney

Discrimination in the workplace occurs when everyday, normal business functions are conducted in a way that discriminates against a protected class of applicants or employees. There are federal laws in place that prohibit this behavior, and California also has its own legislation to further combat discriminatory practices in the workplace. The California Fair Employment and Housing Act makes it illegal to discriminate based on the following:

  • Color
  • Race
  • Religion
  • National origin
  • Medical condition
  • Disability status
  • Marital status
  • Sex
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Pregnancy
  • Sexual orientation

This is not an exhaustive list of protected classes under California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act, so it can be helpful to reach out to a San Mateo employment law attorney if you think you are a victim of employment discrimination. 

What Might Discrimination Look Like at Work?

Biases and prejudice that people hold can present themselves in numerous ways, but having an idea of what to look for can often make identifying discrimination easier. Favoritism and clashing personalities do not always mean discrimination. Some people naturally get along better or worse with other people. However, if biased treatment and opportunities are based on factors like race, gender, or age, the behavior becomes illegal and discriminatory.

Employment discrimination can occur at any stage, from application and onboarding to promotion and termination. If white employees are given bigger, more profitable contracts to work on, that could be discrimination. Managers could be discriminating if female workers are not given advancement opportunities as often as their male counterparts. When applicants with disabilities are refused accommodations, this could be discriminatory hiring. 

It is impossible to list every scenario in which HR staff, supervisors, and management teams could discriminate against their employees or potential applicants. Employment discrimination can be obvious in some cases, but it can also be subtle and systemic. Other examples include:

  • Always assigning undesirable shifts or work hours to certain employees
  • Excluding some employees from special projects
  • Reprimanding some workers for something others are allowed to do

If any of these actions are based on the employees’ religion, age, disability status, gender, or other protected class, it could be considered discrimination. 

California Employees are Legally Protected

Federal laws such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 provide much-needed protection from employment discrimination. California workers have an extra layer of protection due to the Fair Employment and Housing Act. 

California’s Act states that discrimination is not allowed in business advertisements, applicant screening, working conditions, or participation in training. It also says that companies with five or more employees:

  • are required to provide disability leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition
  • cannot retaliate against employees that report discrimination

If you have experienced employment discrimination and need guidance from a San Mateo discrimination attorney, the Law Office of Jeannette A. Vaccaro can help. Contact us to find out how we can advocate for you.

Think You May
Have A Case?

Jeannette is passionate about employee rights. She fights to shed light on injustices and to help her clients move beyond troubling times. Contact Jeannette today for a free case evaluation.

Jeannette A. Vaccaro is a Passionate and zealous advocate, representing employees in all facets of employment law.

Think You May Have A Case?

Jeannette is passionate about employee rights. She fights to shed light on injustices and to help her clients move beyond troubling times. Contact Jeannette today for a free case evaluation.

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